Watch out for phishing


#1

Phishing is an attempt to steal your confidential information — such as your user name, password, or One Time Password via an email or other direct communication. A hacker can fake sender information, tricking you into believing the message is from Amazon, while directing you to another website that is designed to steal your account information. Amazon takes this issue very seriously, and to make it easy to identify phishing attempts, we will never ask you to verify sensitive information over email.

If you are asked to follow a link, you can check the web address to ensure the site is legitimate before entering your information. Genuine Amazon websites always end with "amazon.com," "amazonsellerservices.com," or "sellercentral.amazon.com." While domains can appear legitimate at first glance, Amazon will never ask you to log in to a website other than "amazon.com," "amazonsellerservices.com," or "sellercentral.amazon.com." Please also note that if you receive emails about your account health, you can check the Account Health page in Seller Central to confirm their legitimacy.

Whenever in doubt, go directly to Amazon or the Seller Central website in your web browser and send any suspicious emails you receive to stop-spoofing@amazon.com

Learn how to identify false (spoofed) emails


#2

This is so important! Are all sellers forced to do two-step auth to login now?


#3

Amazon Start by locking down This Forum. Nothing on this Forum should appear in Google Searches.


#4

There are some situations where Amazon does ask sellers to login to different websites. I won’t go into details here because as mentioned above, this forum is available to the public.

Employees from Amazon will also reach out from time to time requesting information such as a phone number and time they can contact you on. There are security issues with this as well and Amazon should come up with a better means of communication between department heads, surveyors or other Amazon employees and sellers.


#5

I had someone pretending to be an Amazon representative to try and scam me out of a shipment. Amazon hasn’t done anything about the reports I’ve sent regarding the buyer’s messages and subsequent feedback left when I didn’t fall for the scam.


#7

Seller support agents need to be better trained on this topic. I received phishing email about a week ago. It was very well done and professional looking. It didn’t seem quite right so I contacted seller support. The rep said that it was from Amazon and to follow the instructions in the email. It still didn’t sit well with me so I entered fake credentials and it went into an endless bot detection loop and never told be the credentials were incorrect. I contacted support again. The second rep said it was absolutely a phishing attempt designed to steal my account credentials. If I had followed the first reps instructions it could have been a disaster.


#8

If the forum were locked down then instructions such as those in the last Amazon Post, on how to reset your account if it is compromised, would not be accessible.


#9

I got a message from help@weareforsureamazon.com is that legit?


#10

Just last night, I received an Amazon OTP verification code two times when I didn’t attempt to log into Amazon account. Always be careful with pre-filled passwords and add two step authentication for extra protection.


#11

Probably not.


#12

The news bulletin said
“Amazon has zero tolerance for fraud”

I have not laughed so hard all week.


#13

they should remove this part:

Phishing e-mails often contain spelling or grammar errors. This is a clear sign of fraud.

ALL of Amazon’s reps have the absolute worst grammar and spelling I’ve ever seen in my life, and I have a 8 year old kid…if we ignore all emails with these errors we will never hear from support again!


#14

I just got a call. Caller ID showed the 206 area code. The caller claimed to be from Amazon. Wanted to know how I was doing during this COVID crisis. Amazon has never called me out of the blue. They asked for my email address. I said you called me so you should have it. She then told me to have a nice day and hung up.

Any body else getting calls from Amazon to find out how they are doing?


#15

I just look at the email address from which the email came from to see that they are not amazon, and all the links direct you to a false website which you can clearly see if you would just look at them.
I suppose that I am an ex-network engineer and web developer I can easily spot them without much digging into them.

Just look and pay attention to the little things is the easiest way to identify these items.


#16

When was the last time that you noticed for more than few minutes ?


#17

Yes, and I was concerned at first but the only identifying information they asked for was to verify the email address on the account. I know it was a legit call as the representative followed up our conversation through the case log on Seller Central.

If you are concerned, you can probably ask them to open a case in Seller Central first to verify they are from Amazon. I probably should have done that but the email address was the only piece of information I was willing to give up. I do think they need to come up with a better way to verify the authenticity of the phone call.


#18

“we are for sure amazon . com”? they’re trying to convince you to believe them


#19


#20

Only sellers can be frauded by Amazon customers and get away with it…I laughed too when I read Amazon has zero tolerance for fraud… how many times does a buyer have to commit fraud to actually get kicked off LOL

Anyway I did get a phishing email a week ago just saying "Suspended"in the subject line… my eyes opened quite wide.and jaw dropped (as with stupid Amazon bots anything is possible no matter how good your account health is) until I started reading the message and saw the email address and link and I knew it was fake/scam/phishing.


#21

They put a case in my file. An email saying to be expecting a call would have been helpful. Because there is a lot I could have said.