New listing requirements for Price Per Unit information


#1

Price Per Unit (PPU) information is used by customers to compare and evaluate products during their shopping journey. To deliver a complete, consistent, and accurate PPU experience, Amazon will be implementing the following data requirements for U.S. sellers.

  1. 1. Starting June 12, 2019, products sold within the U.S. Consumable product types listed below will require all new listings to include the unit_count attribute, which was previously optional. Unit count includes a value (unit_count, e.g. "5") and a unit type (unit_count_type, e.g. "ounce"). The unit type will be restricted to the following units:
    • fluid ounce
    • ounce
    • pound
    • gram
    • count

    Data submissions without this information will fail. The scope of this change includes any product-level data submissions, whether through Excel templates, Seller Central, or XSD feeds.

  2. Similarly, on June 12 products sold within the same U.S. Consumables product types will also require updates to existing impacted listings to include the unit_count attribute. ASINs without unit count information or with incorrect values in the unit_count_type attribute will require this information when listings are updated. Any updates that do not include this information will be rejected.

The change will be applicable to the following Consumables product types:

  • BEAUTY
  • BODY_CARE_PRODUCT
  • FRAGRANCE, HAIR_CARE_PRODUCT
  • HAIR_REMOVAL_AND_SHAVING_PRODUCT
  • LUXURY_BEAUTY
  • MAKE_UP, SKIN_CARE_PRODUCT
  • HEALTH_MISC
  • DAILY_LIVING_AIDS, DIETARY_SUPPLEMENTS
  • HEALTH_FOOD, OTC_MEDICATION
  • PERSONAL_CARE_APPLIANCE
  • SEXUAL_WELLNESS
  • BABY_FOOD
  • GROCERY

For guidance on choosing the right unit of measure, refer to How to determine Price Per Unit. For additional questions and concerns, please contact Seller Support.


#2

Best news ever!


#3

Let us reserve judgment until after the policing Amabot rolls out. :smiley:


#4

Will we need to update the cost per … anytime we change the overall selling price of the item?


#5

I believe Amazon figures the price per unit (PPU) with the info you provided. So when your selling price changes, Amazon uses that along with the already given unit/count. It should change automatically.


#6

It would be better news if they required one particular unit of measurement for items sold by weight or fluid ounces like liquid health and beauty items or foods . It is hard to compare at a glance when one product uses unit count (like $1.00/unit) when the same type of product uses price per ounce and yet another does per pound. I came across that with pine nuts. One listing was 2 bags and had the per unit price. Another had price per gram, another had price per ounce, and yet another had price per pound.


#7

There is so much confusion about what constitutes a “unit” that this could hurt customers more than it helps. Even where the info is clear, some sellers will abuse this, and honest sellers will be put through the Seller Support torture machine for doing things right. Until you can provide proper support for listing issues, I would advise against complicating things further.


#8

Thank you. I’ve always wondered if it were just me. ‘Number of units’ can be scary. I often bundle two complementary items. One unit or two? Price per unit only makes sense if it’s 2 units and that would seem the intuitive answer, but then again the two are now a single (bundled) item. Don’t want to be disappointing buyers who expect more than they’ll get.


#9

I totally agree. An example: when one pack of socks contains three pairs, and we start bundling those packs, everyone gets confused. All of a sudden the price is really low and the listing morphs into something else to fit the interpretation of the latest seller. The customers don’t know what to expect and that opens the door to disappointment and expensive return fees.

I see all kinds of gobbledygook in the variation fields, and good luck trying to explain to Seller Support. They won’t fix the page without a notarized letter from God testifying that it’s indecipherable.


#10

It wouldn’t be scary if everyone followed the guidelines. If you’re selling one 4 oz tube of hand cream, the unit count is 4 (not one). And the unit type is oz.


#11

That example is self evident- the ounces are already counted and there is only one tube, so one unit.
There’s never a problem if you use an example of a non-problem. Not the situation being discussed.


#12

No. I’m correcting your view of what a “unit” is. If you have two 4 oz tubes of hand cream you’re saying that’s 2 units. Which is wrong. It’s 8 oz. A unit is not necessarily one item. It’s a measure. Your example stated two items means 2 units.


#13

My example said I was unsure in the case of bundling two discreet items. An example that does not have any weight measurement. The measurement we were discussing was of a single item as a unit. @no_name_5973 spoke of socks. In those instances it can be confusing as to how many units there are. Your example does not apply to that situation.


#14

Socks shouldn’t even be impacted by this.

"The change will be applicable to the following Consumables product types:

BEAUTY
BODY_CARE_PRODUCT
FRAGRANCE, HAIR_CARE_PRODUCT
HAIR_REMOVAL_AND_SHAVING_PRODUCT
LUXURY_BEAUTY
MAKE_UP, SKIN_CARE_PRODUCT
HEALTH_MISC
DAILY_LIVING_AIDS, DIETARY_SUPPLEMENTS
HEALTH_FOOD, OTC_MEDICATION
PERSONAL_CARE_APPLIANCE
SEXUAL_WELLNESS
BABY_FOOD
GROCERY"


#15

I used socks to illustrate my point, which you have proven by arguing about what constitutes a unit. I have actually seen pairs of socks listed as two units (one for each sock). I’ve seen many issues in many categories.


#16

And if you sell a product that weighs 6 fl.oz. but is a concentrate so it actually makes 1 gallon; and your competitor sells their 6 fl.oz product which is not a concentrate so it is only 6 fl.oz. - how will the consumer benefit?

I’m apprehensive at best. I suspect the first seller will get “screwed” in sales because the customer will not be able to see one product is 6 fl. oz and the other actually gives you a full gallon.


#17

I think UNIT is to mean the government standard of measure for that product as grocery/drug stores have to use. A 100 gram pill is a unit in one instance and fluid ounce drinks are another. There are laws in the US governing how this must be done in stores and I am glad it is happening here. I not only sell but shop and how many times did I almost buy something to see “oh heck no! That is one 16 ounce box, not one case of 12 16 ounce boxes.” for nearly the same price!


#18

your title would say concentrate and have a different upc right?


#19

What does product type mean? Is that category, sub-category?

BEAUTY
BODY_CARE_PRODUCT
FRAGRANCE, HAIR_CARE_PRODUCT
HAIR_REMOVAL_AND_SHAVING_PRODUCT
LUXURY_BEAUTY
MAKE_UP, SKIN_CARE_PRODUCT
HEALTH_MISC
DAILY_LIVING_AIDS, DIETARY_SUPPLEMENTS
HEALTH_FOOD, OTC_MEDICATION
PERSONAL_CARE_APPLIANCE
SEXUAL_WELLNESS
BABY_FOOD
GROCERY


#20

It can be either one.

As a general rule of thumb, “Product Type” - “Local Label Name” in certain reports, a ‘human-friendly’ term; the list in @Amazon_News’ initial post that you’ve reproduced shows the “feed_product_type” used in both those reports and in Amazon’s back-end databases themselves that are the ‘computer-friendly’ version of the human-readable terms - indicates a ‘high-level category’ in Amazon’s Browse Tree Node infrastructure - but that itself has become so convoluted over the years that the original classification architecture no longer necessarily applies.