Why the ridiculous DVD restrictions?


#1

When seeking selling approval for higher priced DVDs you get this information:

Only sellers who meet the following criteria are eligible to apply:
•If you do not have a Professional seller account, you must agree to upgrade to a Professional selling plan within 30 days after your application is approved
•Order-Defect Rate (ODR) of 1% or less
•Cancellation Rate of 2.5% or less
•Late Shipment Rate of 4% or less

Your current metrics are available in the Performance section of your seller account.

If your account does not meet the minimum criteria, your application will be rejected. Please take corrective action and ensure your performance metrics meet the minimum criteria before completing the application.

(makes absolute sense!)

If you meet that and apply for approval you then get this:

Do you buy the products you intend to sell directly from distributors or liquidators?
(that knocks out all sellers that get items from thrift stores, garage sales or personal inventory)

How many units do you intend to sell?
(They refuse your application unless it’s over 30)

Do you have three purchase orders (POs) or invoices from the last 90 days displaying your largest inventory purchases?
Requirements for purchase orders or invoices
•Must be dated on or after October 16, 2014
•Must have document issuer’s name, address, phone number, email or website
•POs must have your name or issuing business name
•POs must have contact information for your business (e.g. address, phone number, email or website)
•Please obscure pricing information (optional)

This just takes the small seller out of the equation completely.

Applications are now being taken but the approval process is ridiculous!


#2

“Not if the small seller knows what to do. It can be done.”

Can you please be a bit more vague.


#3

Hello musicogswell,

Beginning in September 2014, as part of Amazon’s ongoing efforts to provide a great shopping experience, we began restricting listings in the Video, DVD, & Blu-ray category. We did so because these products may have a higher risk of authenticity issues. Amazon is always working to ensure the best possible customer experience.

Additional information on the applicatin process may be found at this link:
[https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?ie=UTF8&nodeId=201607560]

Thanks for using the Seller Forums!

-Susan


#4

Those aren’t really all that different from the changes in September. You had to have invoices then, as now. Obviously whatever tightening they did last fall wasn’t tight enough, so they are revamping. did you get approved last fall (good) or did you wait (not so good)?

The only constant on Amazon is change. It’s not going to get any easier.


#5

This change started last September, not New
>
> How many units do you intend to sell?
> (They refuse your application unless it’s over 30)

That’s new

>
> Do you have three purchase orders (POs) or invoices from the last 90 days displaying your largest inventory purchases?
> Requirements for purchase orders or invoices
> •Must be dated on or after October 16, 2014
> •Must have document issuer’s name, address, phone number, email or website
> •POs must have your name or issuing business name
> •POs must have contact information for your business (e.g. address, phone number, email or website)
> •Please obscure pricing information (optional)

Other than the update in invoice dates (90 instead of 180) that’s also all the same

>
>
> This just takes the small seller out of the equation completely.
>
> Applications are now being taken but the approval process is ridiculous!

Not if the small seller knows what to do. It can be done. Btdt.


#6

You don’t because they don’t care about the small seller with a handful of old DVDs that they want to get rid of. They’re not that important to Amazon as a business, certainly not as important as the reasons they decided to have the recent restrictions.

There were issues with counterfeit DVDs being sold through the site, there are few good ways to combat that, and Amazon now has a stronger interest in keeping the studios happy. On the other side of that is the guy with some used DVDs they found at a garage sale that they’d like to sell. Guess which side wins that particular battle.


#7

How does one now sell USED DVD’s? These restrictions are ridiculous for sellers that sell used product.


#8

This is funny, because you then let the #1 Counterfeiting country in the world on Amazon to sell anything and everything, and continue to turn a blind eye to the issues.

Also these foreign sellers have the buy box on many items with 30 day delivery windows. How is that for customer experience.

One hand of Amazon has no idea what the other hand is doing at any given time.

Edited by: StoptheMadness on Jan 14, 2015 8:54 AM


#9

i love how amazon frowns on used DVD product but they give the buy box to a USED offer even when NEW items are available on the same catalog page…bet that catches a lot of buyers off-guard as well–thinking the big orange BUY NOW button is for new, but then they get a USED item in the mail because that was the offer in the buy box at the time the customer came by…although this is a clever way to get rid of USED sellers…they will just rack up AZ claims by these buyers that don’t realize what they are purchasing…


#10

Does she mean that a small seller needs to buy inventory at a one time shot then they are approved.

Again, that seems ridiculous!


#11

> How does one now sell USED DVD’s? These restrictions are ridiculous for sellers that sell used product.

One only gets to sell used if one qualifies to sell NEW,

Pretty obvious.

Amazon is becoming a tiered marketplace.

Some categories are for real businesses and sellers who run their businesses like real businesses.

Other categories are still easy entry.

Each year the number of easy entry categories is reduced.

Within restricted categories there are still tiers with more restrictions - like Luxury Beauty in Beauty.

It is their store. It is not to every seller’s advantage to sell here. And it is getting harder for many sellers to sell here. You get to make decisions on what’s best for you, just as Amazon does on what’s best for them.

Although the tighten the rules for 3P sellers, growth in 3P sales on Amazon is enormous. What’s best for Amazon is probably no longer what’s best for you.

It still works for me.


#12

I have stated it before but let us look at a conspiracy theory. The reason given for the tightening up of DVD sellers is prevention of copied material or counterfeit material. This is partially valid. What may not be stated is DVD sales on a retail level is totally soft. There are no longer large retailers exclusively dealing in DVD sales or rentals. Downloading material is more and more popular. Look at the growth of NetFlix and of course Amazon’s downloading capabilities. Therefore manufacturers, distributors and studios have probably influenced Amazon’s decisions of abilities to sell DVD products. In most cases these influences do not see any profits from third party DVD products that are not purchased either directly from their sources or are downloaded. Since Amazon deals directly in marketing DVD products and downloading they are influenced by the manufacturers. This is unlike Ebay who do not deal with their own product sales.


#13

Apparently not, Amazon appears to be starting to require additional invoices from already approved over $25 MSRP DVD sellers for each individual ASIN and the quantity for each, that the seller wants to list/sell. 2 people have posted about receiving the email from Amazon already -

https://sellercentral.amazon.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=237509&tstart=0

https://sellercentral.amazon.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=237463&tstart=15


#14

I think Amazon is actually losing money due to these selling restrictions on 3P sellers. I do estate clean outs for a living and get more than a few new DVD’s and DVD sets as a result. But, I can’t sell them on Amazon because I didn’t buy them from a distributor OR they cost more than $24.95 when they were new. Makes no sense when you think about it. Amazon could PROFIT from these sales, but due to these restrictions, some other selling venues I use are profiting off these sales instead!


#15

+One hand of Amazon has no idea what the other hand is doing at any given time.+

No, not Amazon!! :frowning:

Mystical Rose


#16

“best possible customer experience.”

Wrong.

The buyer now has to pay more for it, or buy it elsewhere.
Reducing seller competition results in higher prices, a lack of choice and diminished products available on amazon. Is that good deal for the customer?

Example…
I bought out the remainder stock from a known reputable warehouse I have receipts for the 400 pieces purchased in late 2013 in 2014 I was the only seller selling them since I bought all remaining copies, I was also selling for less than the retail price.

Well that item hasn’t even been available for sale on amazon ever since it was restricted.

That’s just one example, aprox 10-15 other titles that I sold previously are just not for sale anymore used or new.


#17

The main thing I will say is this… The other marketplaces for DVDs are priced 20-50% lower than Amazon now. I would skip the approval process and diversify venues…

The customers are headed to the lower prices anyway.

If you are looking for a DVD to buy, you Google the UPC and get a variety of marketplaces and prices… Amazon is now the highest priced, on average.


#18

Some of them they let me list and others are now showing up Restricted. It is so frustrating. As a small seller It isn’t obvious to me how to fix this. Can someone spell it out? Do I need to find somewhere to buy a few things from a Wholesaler? I tried this before and the stuff they shipped me were junk titles.


#19

Seems more apparent that they’re willing to give up some used DVD sales in order to strengthen their relationships for their growing digital download business as well as limit liability on counterfeit sales.


#20

Yes the opposite is happening. I have monitored the ASINs in which I was affected with this restriction, and it’s obvious buyers are headed elsewhere due to big price disparity and simple lack of inventory on Amazon.

Titles with serious authentication issues were restricted in the first place. So these restrictions do nothing for that.

But I doubt you have a proper reply to this argument.