Scammed big time. How to respond?


#12

It wasn’t necessarily the guy you sent the code to that disseminated it. If you didn’t create the promotion correctly it may have actually showed up on your offer so anyone could see it/use it.


#13

>
> The extent to which you read things into what other people say borders on remarkable.

The extent is which you fail to understand even basic concepts is quite saddening but also seems to be in-line with your posting vast quantities of posts over anything resembling quality posts. Your trolling abilities are though quite remarkable.

Now going back to this threads topic at hand, pretending the Vine program and what happened here are closely related, is “silly” at best.

In addition, Amazon’s purpose was not to purposely pad new products with fake reviews…but to actually provide new products for customers to write “unbiased” (or at least as close as could be) reviews on. I have never heard of any Vine member being pressured into changing a negative review or getting/demanding additional compensation to…that can happen with this email “side-deal” private product reviews.

Regardless…if a Vine code ever were to leak out/become multiple use…Amazon would not started calling customers scammers…but would take responsibility for their own mishap by either honoring the orders or cancelling.

OP has the same business choices he/she needs can make. In either case, it’s OP self-induced problem that can be blamed on no one else that OP needs to clean up.


#14

>
> You didn’t hear of it in this case, either, but it doesn’t keep you from saying it, evidently.
>
>

So you have heard of Vine-members being pressured by Amazon into changing their reviews or is this just another example of you needlessly debating something…just for the sole purpose of saying the opposite ?


#15

Please explain how you derived your interpretation from the OP’s statement?

Ummm…how can that happen? When has that happened?

Or is this yet another situation where just because you determine that it’s possible something can happen you’re going to argue as though it definitely has and that somehow bolsters your argument? I’ve noticed you tend to:

  1. Attribute violations of Amazon rules to the OP of the thread even though no such violations were stated or implied, and in some cases are repeatedly denied.

  2. Proceed to argue about these violations of the guidelines that haven’t actually occurred.


#16

>It appears you wanted to purposefully (regardless if allowed or not) hope to influence positive reviews…but were burned in the process…

The extent to which you read things into what other people say borders on remarkable. In the other thread you read all sorts of possible seller errors, none of which were mentioned by the original poster, into the situation.

Here, you choose to denigrate the OP by saying “It appears” he wanted to do something you consider nefarious when there is no evidence of that, and regarding which the original poster said he had been offered the opportunity for the applicant to “genuinely review” his product. Giving things out for review is not exactly a new procedure (because people don’t +buy+ them to review), so your 'tude is rather misplaced. (In case you’re not aware, Amazon itself gives away things for review all the time: https://www.amazon.com/gp/vine/help ).

I’m apparently a lot more sympathetic to someone who may have simply made a mistake while attempting to follow Amazon’s rules and give out product for review, and got stung doing it, than some of you . . .

bunga bunga!


#17

>The extent is which you fail to understand even basic concepts is quite saddening but also seems to be in-line with your posting vast quantities of posts over anything resembling quality posts.

Yeah, but you have to admit my grammar usually works, and I wouldn’t use the word “post” three times in the same sentence . . .

>I have never heard of any Vine member being pressured into changing a negative review or additional compensation, etc…that can happen with this email “side-deals”.

You didn’t hear of it in this case, either, but it doesn’t keep you from saying it, evidently.

bunga bunga!


#18

LOL! It is you who is claiming something has happened or could happen for which you have no evidence at all . . . and this would make the third thread for that sort of thing, wouldn’t it?

Tell me all about how the OP was going to pressure this reviewer by handing him a free product. What, exactly, would be the force he would bring to bear?

bunga bunga!


#19

You cannot even be sure that the sample reviews he showed you were written by him.

You should have tested him by telling him to add one sentence … to one of his alleged reviews.

Then you should have looked up the way to create a one-time code and changed the listing to one only.

You tried to buy a positive review, now you purchased none.

Fair trade, I think.

You are not the first or the only one who got taken.

It is quite an industry especially since Amazon introduced the coupon code promos.


#20

Again, complete reading of the entire conversation is critical for any hopes of you understanding the replies given.
In this thread, we are talking about *email solicitation buyer review * requests.

These are distinctly different compared to Vine reviews or almost any other type of free offer reviews…given the vast majority of the time, these solicitation emails make it quite clear they are offering a guaranteed “positive” review, in exchange for your free product.

As previously wrote, no one stated OP “violated” any rules…but (per the emails wording) it is clear these type of solicitation emails are clearly providing a “trade” service (glowing review(s) for free product(s).

If OP is dead-set on giving away free products and willing to get the most “unbiased” opinions and the least likelihood of having the outcome they did…he/she can easily email/search for “top” reviewers under the Amazon main pages.

Shifting the ball to +asking+ for unbiased product reviews compared to basically “buying” a service by responding to these email solicitation inquiries…will make all the world of difference and help to minimize any of OP’s similar problems in the future.


#21

>
> So your argument is that the e-mail made it clear that the reviewer was ‘selling’ glowing reviews in exchange for free product,

No, the argument is responding to these “offers” was the first mistake. Not knowing how to properly setup a promotion was the second and was no one’s “fault” besides OP’s.

Just like in life, if say you’re looking for a quality gold watch…purchasing it from that shady street vendor that comes running up to you…might not be your best course of action.

Take the self-initiative and go find some reputable jewelry stores yourself.


#22

So your argument is that the e-mail made it clear that the reviewer was ‘selling’ glowing reviews in exchange for free product, and that’s based on the wording/content of an e-mail you didn’t actually see, and which the only description is "I was sent an Amazon message by a guy who wanted to genuinely review one of my items "

It’s hard to follow your instructions to read the entire thread when you apparently consider things you make up or assume to be part of the thread.

I’m also still curious how these non-Vine review arrangements can go wrong in the way you suggested: “I have never heard of any Vine member being pressured into changing a negative review or getting/demanding additional compensation to…that can happen with this email “side-deal” private product reviews.”

Or, you know, learning how to create the correct one-time discount code. That would probably help as well.


#23

They may have actually purchased 18.


#24

Perhaps if the reviewer refuses to change their negative review to positive, the seller pressures the reviewer by threatening to send even worse products?


#25

>I’m also still curious how these non-Vine review arrangements can go wrong in the way you suggested . . .

Since this question has now been asked twice and not answered either time, I think it’s unlikely that it will be. So I’ll give it a shot:

“Yeah, so, I sent you that free product, and now you have it, and, uh, I expect you to write a really good review, or else I’ll, uh, well, you know . . .”

bunga bunga!


#26

Lesson here … Is it really worth giving away free product via Amazon or any other site for phony or untruthful reviews? Personally I would want unbiased re keys, not ones I bribed someone for.
This is only my opinion of course, however, short of contacting law enforcement, you are unfortunately SOL on this one.


#27

Yes, you do, if you wish to waste even more time on such an obvious “debate”.

Of course, they want positive reviews for their free products.

Entirely unbiased of course.

No, they cannot force the reviewer or Amazon to remove the review if they leave negative or to make them leave any sort of reviews at all but there is a bias in these person-to-person interactions, and you know that very well.

Tomorrow in a different thread, you will argue on the opposite side, if you happen to choose different color socks that morning.


#28

>Is it really worth giving away free product via Amazon or any other site for phony or untruthful reviews?

I wish someone would explain to me this need to assume bad faith on the part of the OP.

When Amazon Vine sends out free product – or ANYONE does – are they always doing it “for phony or untruthful reviews”?

bunga bunga!


#29

Yes, that is possible also but only if seller actually sends all the items out.


#30

>There is an unwritten understanding

Need I even point out the logical flaw here?

bunga bunga!


#31

There is an unwritten understanding that these self-appointed reviewers will give eloquent, positive reviews, if anything at all for the free product.

A little more than 5 out of 5, “fine product”.

The Vine program does not require the same type of person-to-person interaction.

Do you think if they produced all negative sample reviews to convince the suckers to send out free products in hope that they will get one more product to review they would get the same success rate receiving products than for positive sample reviews?

On top of that, you cannot even be sure that the sample reviews were written by the person who approaches the seller … the minimum is that the reviews should be confirmed by the method I mentioned above before the free product code is sent out. At the moment a review can be rewritten / modified at any time on Amazon, so the minimum the seller should ask is that the reviewer should prove that he did not only send the review link to some top reviewer’s public page, but he can write and modify those reviews at any time.