Returns out of control on amazon


#50

>Yes you sure can, and then the buyer leaves a negative feedback and Amazon won’t remove it. Despite linking them to the policy page saying what restocking fees can be charged. LOL

Correct, it has gotten much more difficult to get those feedbacks removed. Doesn’t mean you cannot withhold the restocking to protect yourself, however.

bunga bunga!


#51

Define what you consider “large sellers” ?


#52

Hey that’s the business! What can I say if you want to be in this business that’s what you have to deal with. Case closed!


#53

Get out of this business as fast as you can.

The golden days are LONG gone.

I sold Oakley for years, they recently took that away from me.

I just got a return request from someone that purchase something back in September. I closed the case, but I am certain they will file an A-Z claim, because people are scumbags.

Amazon does not give a crap about you or your business.

Get out now.


#54

Seller Return Policy
When you order from a seller that fulfills and ships its own inventory (also called a third party seller), your return is sent back to the seller instead of Amazon.com. While most sellers offer a returns policy equivalent to Amazon.com’s, some seller returns policies may vary. You can view the return policy of the seller before you purchase an item by viewing the Returns and Refunds Policy section of the seller profile page. Once you’ve ordered, you can select your order in the Online Returns Center, to view the seller return policy.

Sellers are allowed to have no return policies , as long as they are in product description for listing. For example seller can state : Seller’s additional return policy as amazon allows seller to have: seller does not accept returns.


#55

^ Sellers have to have a policy at least as favorable as Amazon’s own return policy. Your policy can vary in that it can be MORE lenient than Amazon’s, but it cannot be LESS lenient. There may be a handful of very lucrative sellers who have specifically been granted permission from Amazon to have their own return policies, but those are very few and very far between, having likely been given the ability to actually edit the return information on their Amazon storefront.

If anyone could have a “no returns” policy, then wouldn’t everyone choose to have that policy?


#56

Amazon still gives buyer a thru z claim even if seller has no return policy. A thru z claims protect against damage and defect and items not described accurate. Buyer no longer needing item or buyer changing mind are not buyer protected under a thru z claim. Seller has protection against buyers that try to return for no longer or changing mind.

Seller can charge restocking fees for buyer changing mind.

request Restocking fee
The buyer changes their mind* about a purchase and returns an item in the original condition within the return window. Yes. Up to 20% of item’s price.
The buyer changes their mind* about a purchase and returns a non-media item within the return window, but the seller receives the item damaged or materially different than how it was originally shipped to the buyer. Yes. Up to 50% of item’s price

Buyer needs to understand pressing the order button makes and agreement and contract with seller. Buyer gets item, seller gets paid. Seller stating no return policy in description is not an inaccurate description. Buyer ordered and keeps item and seller is paid.


#57

Your policy can vary in that it can be MORE lenient than Amazon’s, but it cannot be LESS lenient.

A no return policy is not less lenient. The a thru z claim gives buyer protection on damage, defect or items described wrong.

No return policy protects sellers against buyers changing minds or no longer needing.

When orders are places, money is placed in account. Seller does not get money until after delivery. Seller even has to pay to ship thinking going to get money back after delivery cause money from order in account.

So if buyer no longer needs or changes mind and seller has to get item returned back, seller would be paying $18.85 to ship and $18.85 to return. So seller paid $37.70 so buyer changes mind or no longer needs. That is wrong.

I make clear to seller I would not sell item cause I want buyer to understand seller policy. Items are delicate handled with care, expensive. Buyer always state they want rather than understanding these are contracts. If buyer does not want don’t purchase. Items change value shipping back and forth so much.


#58

A return is a policy cause there is the sale first. If sellers can’t have no return policies with only a thru z claim for range defects and wrong descriptions. Buyers can window shop thru the mail. Shipping fees will be paid to much. Big businesses may be ok with paying shipping fees back and forth cause they have stock to sell. Sellers with only 1 stock do not have money to pay these shipping back and forth. A seller is willing to ship cause money in account after delivery. No seller will ship item without money in an account


#59

FYI - I tried the 1 cent thing and ended up with a bunch of negative feedback. The customers are using the Holiday displays they bought and than sending them back dirty and used with similar reasons. Some of them are intentional and state “no longer needed” but Amazon continues to refund them despite my ongoing objections. I’m starting to look at other places to sell that don’t rip me off daily.
Again, a class action suit threat might do them some good.


#60

Could NOT agree MORE!!! Most buyers know that “inaccurate website description” is the way to get a free return.


#61

> bunga bunga!

I think it would be a great idea if customers would be forced to confront their own lack of reading the details on the products page. Some easy questions should make a buyer shut up, like was this item being sold in the correct category? In other words, why were you buying something in the sewing pattern category if you were looking for actual garments. If an item got listed in the wrong category, then than is a justifiable problem. What did the title say including the brand owner that is written right above the title? What exactly did the photo show? If it is showing a red dress, why would you have expected a blue one? If the title said sizes 4-8, why would you have expected to get a size 16? and so for.

Since I got two different return requests in the past couple of weeks for the bought by mistake and not as described excuses that came down to both customers thinking they were getting garment, when both were sewing patterns and described as sewing patterns, something has to change. I think showing a screen print of exactly what the page showed when they made their purchase as well making them think through why they think what they got wasn’t as described might make for good learning experiences for these buyers. They would be forced to show from looking at the product listing page what was wrong. The only way to do this is have Amazon generate a screen print as product pages can be changed.

I have found when going to list on a totally dysfunctional product page, that when I open a case for it to make changes as a seller, that I know include the phrase, “that showing this new title/bullet point helps the buyer to make an informed buying decision” has been getting almost instance approval by the powers that be. I ran into a listing the other day that I had to fix category (I think it was a pattern under a toys subcategory!), title, bullet, description. Probably more things were wrong, but at least the listing now shows the proper information. I only had one ‘friend’ with a listing under, didn’t know the rest, but I shipped her a quick FYI to make sure her item was actually listed correctly.

When I hear folks complaining about not getting the buy box, one thing they need to be really sure of is that the product page is completely accurate. If it isn’t and they do get the buy box, their listing could be clicked on to be bought. But if the page itself is wrong then the buyer does have a good reason to be saying not as described. It is like when there isn’t a listing for a different size of something, they just add theirs to the listing mentioning in the comments that their size is a different one. For those that did that while listing something as new back before the new comments disappeared, they are going to be up a creek when they sell something.

So to me a buyer has to prove how the listing was wrong and it is the seller’s responsibility to
be sure that the listing is correct right down to color, size, brand, etc. It is a two-way street. I can’t be the only sellers that is constantly finding product pages that are either missing vital info, or has sompletely wrong info.


#62

You should have enough of a profit margin to offset this. A few returns (out of 100) is not excessive

No complaints here


#63

Hi,

I believe that if you are using FBA then the returns need to be handling solely by FBA,

IF you are self shipper, then just state all returns have to be within a 2 week period, and no refunds will be authorized without you receiving the merchandise back in and you will approve the refund, once they pay return shipping. Also, you can state there is a 12- 15% restocking charge and this will discourage Bogus returning.

Also, you can say, no returns, unless they contact you with a legitimate reason, via email.

Hope this helps. Amazon, self shipper


#64

You need to refund minus 20% restocking fees and original or return shipping with explanation to buyer why you did it.

If negative feed back received ask Amazon to remove it. They will.

If A-Z case opened - explain why partial refund. It will be closed in your favor as refund was given already.

Always include buyer’s initial message for returns, to remind them initial reason.

Here is info on restocking fees.
This is Amazon policy on returns.

I always include this link for all my buyers and Amazon seller support when A-Z or negative feedback removal.

The customers will be in shock, but there is nothing they can do or say: “I will never will shop with you” and I say: “THANK YOU, I appreciate your decision”.

They learn not to abuse the system.

https://sellercentral.amazon.com/gp/help/201725780?referral=A1V8TOTOK73J6K_A3GY41081B67JO

Also provide this information in your return settings.

When they receive conformation for return the will read your policy

It will sound something like that

"If you are dissatisfied with your order for any reason, you can return your items within 30 days for a prompt refund or exchange. The original shipping and handling charges are not refundable.
For damaged items provide detailed picture.
We only accept return item which is new as received, unused, undamaged, unopened.

** The buyer changes their mind* about a purchase and returns an item in the original condition within the return window. Yes. The buyer returns an item in the original condition more than 15 days past the return window. The 15 days allow for return transportation from the buyer to the seller.
Restocking Fees Up to 20% of item’s price.

**The buyer returns an item in the original condition more than 15 days past the return window. The 15 days allow for return transportation from the buyer to the seller.
Restocking Fees Up to 20% of item’s price.

*The buyer changes their mind about a purchase and returns within the return window, but the seller receives the item damaged or materially different than how it was originally shipped to the buyer.
Restocking Fees Up to 50% of item’s price and original shipping charges are not refundable.


*The customer returns the item for one of the following reasons:

Accidental order
Better price available
No longer needed/wanted

Please use it, it will save you lots of money.
We have been doing that for years with no problems.
Best regards
BlueArrow


#65

Ask Buyer “What exactly is not as described in our listing, we need to make sure and correct information”
Then decide how much to refund, according to Amazon policy.

https://sellercentral.amazon.com/gp/help/201725780?referral=A1V8TOTOK73J6K_A3GY41081B67JO

BAE


#66

I didnt think you could get your re stocking fees from amazon with a Safe T claim


#67

I totally agree that if a customer’s order was confirmed delivered by the promised date (both figures Amazon already has access to), then delivered late/missed delivery date should be shaded out. A customer ordered on Dec 21, I shipped the same day and it was delivered the next day, Dec 22. But they chose ‘delivered too late’ as their reason for return. Amazon should never have accepted this. After subtracting the cost of return shipping, she got a refund of $2. I’m sure she is expecting a full refund. I have filed a SAFE T claim. I’m expecting her to leave bad feedback or an A2Z.


#68

> {quote:title=Eclipsed
> Again, a class action suit threat might do them some good.

Good luck … they know an empty threat has no weight to it…

No lawyer would even consider the cost of a class action suit based on this stuff…no basis


#69

NO Question. This NEW policy of Automated Returns is a bonanza for amazon scammers.

Its costing me postage fees and way too many fraudulent return claims. I have had “customers”
switch products, use products, and flat out lie they got the wrong item. They accept returns on items WAY past the 30 day return policy. Its costing me too much.