Price gouging OK...as long as it's Amazon


#22

I paid $29 for a 32 ounce bottle of alcohol on eBay that normally sells at Walmart for $2.48.

Just because Amazon lists a 4 pack of toilet paper at $72 doesn’t mean anybody is going to buy it, nor are they forced to buy it.

I’ve purposely been selling Kleenex and Puffs tissues on Amazon at the price they were trending at before the first corona virus case in December (you can look it up via Camelcamelcamel), but Amazon still removed my listings just yesterday because they said the prices were too high… even though they were priced normally.

At this point, they don’t even want to look at these necessary item listings on a case by case basis, they just want to cut everybody off from selling anything that could even remotely have a price inflation because of the corona virus, so that they can look like the do-gooders who stopped “price gouging.”

I can’t even get a 3M N95 mask on Amazon right now. I have to go to eBay, where a 2 pack is selling for $29.99…


#23

Yep. Read The Age of Surveillance Capitalism. Google and many other big tech companies almost always blame their short comings on “errors” of some kind. It’s never their fault… it’s the programs fault, the governments fault, the customers fault, the markets fault, blah, blah, blah…


#24

While this may be accurate, Amazon removes listings by third party sellers when they feel that the prices for those listing is too high. Sellers are sent a notice and allowed to amend their price and relist the item(s). Amazon has the same option that they recommend to third party sellers of setting a minimum price AND a MAXIMUM price for ANY item they sell themselves. They should hold themselves to the exact same standards as they mandate for other sellers and their excuse that “this was an automated system issue” isn’t good enough when they kick third party sellers off their site for the same “automated system issues”… They should just admit…“we screwed up, we’re sorry, and we’re refunding every buyer the overcharged amount immediately”.


#25

You should have mentioned that (article on ABC) in the original post. You into drama much?.


#27

link?


#28

Let the demand and the supply dictate pricing. Period.


#29

i complained about this same thing. sometime ago i was selling a computer part, MSRP was $3990 but distributors were marking it up by a few percent and i had to do the same. i was selling it for $4200.i got flagged for price gouging. meanwhile, amazon was selling it for $5500

that’s not a typo. $5500!!!

and it wasn’t a one off event. when a PC component is in short supply, they price gouge up the ***. i’ve seen mark ups as high as 75%, which amounted to hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars. they’re doing it now! at a time when more PCs and servers are needed so people can work remotely.

example ASIN B07Y2PZTQ5. MSRP is $250. amazon was charging $350 for a new item. it sold out even at that price. they were even charging above MSRP for open box returns


#32

I read this same crap and anyone who knows anything about how Amazon works would understand why this happens. It called algorithms. They are programs that change the prices on Amazons products according to the current prices of other sellers. So when the greedy humans manually changed their prices and started gouging Amazon’s changed automatically. Once Amazon realized what was going on they fixed it and got rid of the actual gougers. I think it is really amazing that there are people stupid enough to think that Amazon pays people to manually change the prices of millions of items per second which is what you would have to believe to put any credence in this bs story.


#33

You should find another line of work since you have no clue how retail sales work.


#34

Amazon removed hundreds of mask listings because of price gouging.

Then, 4 days ago, Amazon listed a 3-pack cotton mask (can’t do anything against COVID-19) at 19.99 bucks.

Shame on you Amazon!


#36

Just because Amazon lists a 4 pack of toilet paper at $72 doesn’t mean anybody is going to buy it, nor are they forced to buy it.

Your opinion is funny.

So you tell me what’s the problem I listed the 50 masks at 49.99 bucks? I didn’t force anyone to buy it, but why Amazon deleted my listing?


#37

You’re right – it’s bad. they need to fix it.

i’m not defending them in any way, but I can offer a possible explanation. I can monitor my 20 or so items fairly easily. Amazon has to monitor millions of items they are selling – items for which pricing is set by [poorly written] automation.

One would hope when this is all over Amazon will be issuing refunds to buyers who had to pay those inflated prices for Amazon products.


#39

How about 3 cans of powdered milk for over $100 + shipping?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B07WLV4F3L/ref=dp_olp_new_mbc?ie=UTF8&condition=new


#40

What we’re seeing now is that greed is still alive and kicking, and Bamazon / Bozo is bigger than ever.


#41

Amazon is however responsible for the automated tools it creates and uses and the outcome they produce.


#42

I really don’t believe Amazon is actively price gouging. They are completely automated. It makes sense that some of their prices are going up because their repricing algorithm is raising the price back up because they have booted the competition off the listing. Honestly, it is comical reading some of the comments on how people believe that Amazon has people laughing maniacally while they manually raise prices on specific items. Stop. Breathe. Think.


#43

Why…it is the truth.


#45

I am making reusable masks that can also be sterilized (for healthcare workers). Most supplies are sold out until mid April. Those offered by Amazon are priced ridiculously high. Shame on you Amazon. I purchased anyway bc it is a much needed item to protect our healthcare workers and ultimately, US!


#46

Amazon seems to abide to a different set of rules than the average seller. We have found this to be true long before the covid -19 pandemic


#47

Price gouging has different meanings. Sellers sell to make a profit. If our items cost more and become unavailable, we will have to sell at higher prices. I have removed countless items after receiving a fair market policy violation. My new routine…I list an item using match lowest price which is very little profit. I instantly get a policy violation with steps on how to relist. I immediately close the listing and put the items in a box. Repeat until the box is full and donate it the mission. Not much of a business model.